Video & Writing

In a highly fragmented media landscape, news audiences crave multiple ways to engage with a story. During the first weekend of my full-time summer internship at The Salt Lake Tribune, I was sent to cover the Pride parade — a gathering where thousands of Utahns to celebrate LGBTQ+ identity. We already had photographers on the scene capturing color, but I felt a video would provide yet another entry point into the story.

As the news organization’s only reporter on the scene, I worked to beat the competition and had completed both a video and a written story within hours after the event’s end. The story was published on the front page the next day and it was the second-most popular piece on the website that day, with a reach of more than 7,500 readers. The video also generated its own audience, with more than 1,700 views.

Read the full story online here or see the print copy here

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Pride parade attendees feel sense of urgency to ‘elevate’ the LGBTQ conversation

As they marched in celebration and for acceptance, many in the LGBTQ community also felt a sense of urgency Sunday as thousands of people gathered in downtown Salt Lake City for the culmination of Utah Pride Week.

In fact, many participants in the 42nd annual Utah Pride Parade said they were looking beyond the event, trying to figure out what’s next for the movement under President Donald Trump’s leadership and amid vocal opposition from a group of protesters.

Many answers seemed to lead back to the theme of this year’s festival — “Pride Elevated,” a catchphrase some participants said encompasses the need for people within the LGBTQ movement to elevate new voices in the conversation.

Screen Shot 2018 04 08 at 10.08.00 AM

As they marched in celebration and for acceptance, many in the LGBTQ community also felt a sense of urgency Sunday as thousands of people gathered in downtown Salt Lake City for the culmination of Utah Pride Week.

In fact, many participants in the 42nd annual Utah Pride Parade said they were looking beyond the event, trying to figure out what’s next for the movement under President Donald Trump’s leadership and amid vocal opposition from a group of protesters.

Many answers seemed to lead back to the theme of this year’s festival — “Pride Elevated,” a catchphrase some participants said encompasses the need for people within the LGBTQ movement to elevate new voices in the conversation.

Screen Shot 2018 04 08 at 10.08.00 AM

Chris Wharton, an openly gay candidate for Salt Lake City Council District 3, said Pride is an important and visible reminder that Utah is not as homogenous as some may think.

In the future, he said, the visibility of other types of diversity will become more pronounced, even within Pride and the LGBTQ movement.

“The movement has been criticized for being too focused on the ‘L’ and the ‘G’ — the lesbian and the gay — and not enough on our bisexual community, our transgender community and our gender queer community,” Wharton said. “More opportunities will come to be more inclusive of those other groups as well.”